NO

Author Topic: 3rd party IDEs.  (Read 4169 times)

Anonymous

  • Guest
3rd party IDEs.
« on: March 11, 2005, 05:47:01 am »
Before I ask my question, let me be clear that I like POIDE just fine.

That said...

Has anyone had experience setting up the command line tools in a 3rd party IDE?  

Which one works best?
What problems did you encounter?
What problems were solved?

Justin Thyme

  • Guest
3rd party IDEs.
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2005, 05:58:19 am »
Not entirely sure what you're asking.

In Pelles C, all you have to do is go on the menu to Tools | Customize..., select the Tools tab, and click the New icon.  Follow the prompts.  Easy to setup, and it works well.

Are you asking what IDE's work best with external tools? Or are you asking what external tools people use with Pelles C?

Anonymous

  • Guest
3rd party IDEs.
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2005, 06:47:41 am »
Quote from: "Justin Thyme"
Not entirely sure what you're asking.


I was asking, in my usual clumsy way, if anyone has tested the POCC and POLINK (etc.) command line tools with a 3rd party source editor, like Crimson or Context.

Garvan

  • Guest
3rd party IDEs.
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2005, 04:00:44 am »
Hi.

Third party code editors are the normal for BCX users compiling with Pelles C (JFE, Context, PSPad etc., etc.). However I would hesitate to call these IDE’s because they are not tightly integrated with a particular tool set.

Garvan

Justin Thyme

  • Guest
3rd party IDEs.
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2005, 04:12:30 am »
Quote from: "ldblake"

I was asking, in my usual clumsy way, if anyone has tested the POCC and POLINK (etc.) command line tools with a 3rd party source editor, like Crimson or Context.


Sorry, I probably should have understood better. :wink:

One programmers editor I REALLY like is Scite, based on the Scintilla text engine (http://www.scintilla.org/).  It's pretty easy to set it up to use your compiler of choice.  As was mentioned, I don't think I'd call it an IDE proper...but a programmers text editor with an output windows which configures easily to use many compilers.

For a full blown IDE, you may want to check out Dev-C++, Ultimate++ or Code::Blocks.  I know Code::Blocks is intended to be fairly compiler neutral, not positive about the others.

But personally, I'd just stick with the Pelles C IDE, unless there is a specific feature you're looking for that it doesn't support.  I think Pelle is going to be releasing an update before much longer.

Anonymous

  • Guest
3rd party IDEs.
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2005, 05:10:27 am »
Quote from: "Justin Thyme"
For a full blown IDE, you may want to check out Dev-C++, Ultimate++ or Code::Blocks.  I know Code::Blocks is intended to be fairly compiler neutral, not positive about the others.

But personally, I'd just stick with the Pelles C IDE, unless there is a specific feature you're looking for that it doesn't support.  I think Pelle is going to be releasing an update before much longer.


What I was wanting to do was to set up a subset situation where I could handle projects in a bit more free-form manner.   It's not that Pelles method is lacking, it's just that I'm used to a somewhat more... ummm... unstructured approach.

I've worked with the DEV ide and found it lacking.  It's unstable except in it's base setup as distributed with a compiler.  I haven't looked at Ultimate just yet...  I have looked at a couple of other ones that are based on the Scintilla edit control and they're not too disappointing.  

I used Context extensively with pascal. It's far superior to the Borland IDE and a darned site easier to work with.  (I never got past hating Borland's Rapid Application Design tools... they get between me and my code way too much.)

Thanks for the help on this Justin and Garvan... I think I'll take the advice to just stay with POIDE for now.